It does not have to be a costly venture to add a serene water feature to your front door area, garden, or backyard. The following projects are cost efficient and offer simple solutions for a DIY water feature.

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Basic Materials

No matter the style or size of your DIY water feature project, you will need these basic essentials in your toolkit.

– Submersible Pump
– Vinyl Tubing (clear or black and the size that fits your pump)
– Waterproof Pot or Clear Sealant Spray for Waterproofing
– Drill and Bit
– Medium Size Rocks or Bag of Gravel
– Clear Waterproof Silicone Caulk or Sealant

1. Bubble Fountain

Drill a hole near the bottom of the bigger pot for the pump. Thread the pump cord through the hole and bury under the mulch. Assemble the pots by stacking the smaller pot onto the larger, placing a brick to raise it up. Drill a hole into the bottom corner to place the tubing through and slide it into the smaller pot. Add a few rocks to hold the tubing in place. Make sure the tubing is below the waterline and seal with silicone caulk. Once dry, add water to test. Add additional rocks as you desire, plug in, and enjoy.

Bubble Fountain

2. Pyramid Pots Water Fountain

Gather your desired pots together. Sizes should vary to construct the pyramid styled structure. The sizes used in the image was a 6 inch base, 8 inch base, and 12 inch base size. Gather two additional support pots with an 8 inch and 6 inch base size. These will be nestled inside and flipped upside down to serve as the support to the outer display pots. Drill holes in the center that fit the size of the tubing. The pump will sit in the middle inside of the bottom support pot with tubing reaching upward. As the tubing is fed through each outer and inverted pot, be sure to seal.

Pyramid Pots

3. Brick Fountain

Dig a hole the size to fit the pond liner and gather some bricks to stack around. Use a layer of mortar as needed to even out the surface. Use chalk to outline the area where the pound will be placed at and include pressure treated plywood at the bottom if needed. Cut with a circular saw. Starting with the back corner, lay four to five rows of brick to mark the outside edges and spread the mortar as you place. Add a pond underliner inside the perimeter, using bricks to hold in place. Next stack the inner walls and cut away any excess. When done, add a submersible pump to make your pond become a feature. Stack bricks around the pump to hide it from view.

Brick Fountain

4. Tipsy Water Can Feature

If you have some old galvanized pots or old wash tubs laying around, this can serve as a person water can feature. Drill holes in the corner of the cans or pots and slide over a pipe in the grown. Use the largest bucket at the bottom. Run the hose for your pump alongside the pipe, where you will than slide your watering can over it. Use hose clamps at each level to ensure it keeps the cans from sliding down and helps to support the weight.

Tipsy Water Can Feature

5. Bamboo Water Feature

Perfect for urban living or to use inside your home, this simple bamboo water feature includes a few cuts of bamboo at 3/4in and 5 foot in length. Bind together with twine to rest over the endge of your pot. For the larger size bamboo cup, drill a hole that can fit 3/8in tubing and seal together. Connect the pump and conceal with river rocks from a dollar store.

Bamboo Water Feature

Bonus: Terra Cotta Fountain

Crystal Ayres, MBA
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Crystal Ayres, MBA

Owner & Founder at iCraftopia
The founder of iCraftopia, I specialize in helping the everyday hobbyist and craft entrepreneur find their place in the online marketplace. My primary focus is in mentoring crafters on techniques and strategies that increase their online presence and revenue. In my spare time, I teach craft classes bringing the joy of creativity to others.
Crystal Ayres, MBA
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